Too many links on The New Americana? Let us know.

Ant Man

Over the last few weeks, we’ve received hundreds of emails with suggestions about The New Americana. We thank each and every one of you for both the kind words as well as the harsh ones. Feedback is important and we do not shy away from criticism. After all, there’s enough finger pointing and denial in DC. We want to look at things as they really are.

One suggestion that keeps coming up pertains to the number of links we put on the site. Some say we post too many while others want us to go back to the old days when we would post quite a few more than we do today. As you’ve surely noticed, we post a great deal more than sites like Drudge. We do this because we want to give a more in-depth view of the world, but one particular email this morning caught my attention.

Chad wrote, “People can know what Drudge thinks you need to know in 30 seconds.”

While we always wanted to be better than Drudge rather than just being a Drudge alternative, this particular notion kept ringing in my mind. I ran it by a couple of the editors and they both felt the same thing I did.

“He has a point,” one quipped.

So, we turn to you guys. Leave a comment below in the open or email me directly with your perspectives.

I think there are three options:

  1. Keep it the way it is.
  2. Reduce it down close to Drudge level (we’ll never go all the way down because there’s simply too much that needs to be said).
  3. Create a main section at the top and an in-depth section below. Top headlines, then a section I’d like to think of as the Paul Harvey section. “Now you know the rest of the story.”


JD Rucker

JD Rucker is Editor of this site as well as Soshable, a Conservative Christian Blog. He is a Christian, a husband, a father, and founder of both Judeo Christian Church and Dealer Authority. He drinks a lot of coffee, usually in the form of a 5-shot espresso over ice. Find him on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

  1. I kind of like option #3 and agree that perhaps a slight reduction in links, but obviously, some days are bigger News days than others.

    Plus, I sent email about the number of email posts (new articles) (blog?)I get, that consolidating them with a synopsis & link would be more appropriate, and that would drive more traffic to the site because now, the whole article is sent individually.

  2. I’d mostly keep as is, with more frequent updates. I do like the newest at the top, I don’t have to waste time reading everything to find the new stuff.

  3. I like #3. I also like highlighting with different colors for extra emphasis.
    You are doing a great job, by the way!! Keep up the great work!!

  4. I like the third option; I would add that perhaps the site is heavy on US political news and light on non-political/the rest of the world.

  5. JD, I do find it somewhat cumbersome at times especially if I am traveling and am not able to get on the website every day. Possibly, they could be dated like you do with the Originals. And have more articles from that Joshua Herald person. Oh wait, that’s up to me.

  6. There are a lot of links and it’s difficult to remember how long the links have been up and whether I’ve glanced over them before. Maybe you could have a recent links section for any link from the last 24 hours and have the older links below.

  7. Dear Mr. Rucker:

    I am not sure it is about the number of links (I like more than less of them) that are available as it is the way the ‘tag line’ (the link) reads and communicates to the viewer / reader.

    You mentioned another person said Drudge tells you what they think you need to know in 30 seconds…. in my opinion, that is because of the way they write their headline / tag line on the link….. the downside is that i may not be interested in their particular point of view and will sometimes skip a link that Drudge provides, simply because of what we are talking about – i already know what Drudge wants me take away from the link because of the headline….

    If i click through on a Drudge link, its because i am interested in either the background or in more facts that might / should accompany the idea that the link communicates.

    Same with your website – i enjoy it very much and ‘save it for last’ on my daily rounds of reading….I don’t click on all of the links for the same reason as I don’t click on Drudge…. there has got to be something more about the writer / issue / story that i want to learn than what the headline asks me to take away.

    Not sure this helps, but please keep up your good work. Its a blessing to have an alternative to the stuff that has been out on the net.

  8. I like it. Relatedly, what I don’t like is that it opens a new tab when I click on a link…right click new tab is an option if I want that, but the extra steps involved in your default make it more difficult and time consuming to work through all the great content you’ve provided.

  9. Not at all. Just more work to complete: read. Thank you for all the fine work product that you’ve provided me. Been with you since the start. Dramatically dropped visits to Drudge

  10. I like the #3 option and have the newer links on the top in both sections. I also agree with Kirk, the text in the link is important because it is a headline. Keep up the good work. Compete with Drudge but at the same time be yourself because you are not Drudge. BTW since you started TNA I have rarely been back to Drudge.

  11. I like option 3. That way on days when I don’t have a lot of time, I can’t hit the highlights. Other days I would know I could scroll down and read more. Thanks!

  12. Either 1 or 3. Definitely don’t do less; one of the things I love about this site is the abundance of stories that other places don’t cover!

  13. Way to many links. I’ve gotten to where I only read the top 5 in each row. Also try and bunch them by category. But yes there are way too many links. After one full day get rid of them and archive them .

  14. The thing that’s been bugging me is that the headlines don’t change enough – seems like i see the same ones for days… makes it look like stale news. I like HotAir because i like to see each new story as it pops up – gives the impression of timeliness. If you went with your Option 3, you could make sure those top ones were constantly updated (timely!) and below, have the numerous smaller stories (depth!) But y’all are on the right track, and i really love that i never have to look at Drudge again. 🙂

  15. I don’t believe in too much information. Maybe categorizing the articles such as Stories on: “Hillary”, “Trump”, “Congress”, “Demonic-rats”, “Republicans”, The New Conservative Party”, you get the point. It may not be the volume, but rather finding what they want to read.
    “Great job” no matter what you end up doing!

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