Republicans: The waiting party

Mitch McConnell The Waiting Party

The Hillary Clinton health scare story is revealing yet again the Republican Party’s core weakness: Republicans either can’t fight or won’t fight.

Republicans have become a party that waits for deliverance. Instead of working hard, instigating change, and bringing the battle to the enemy, Republicans wait. They wait for the Supreme Court to strike down a law they don’t like; they wait for prosecutors to hand down an indictment on someone they don’t like.

Ask yourselves, how did those waits turn out? And now they wait for Hillary Clinton to either drop out or die? Is this anything Republicans should be proud of? The party of the Death Wish?

Republicans have become the party that waits for someone else to do the dirty work, to lead the charge, so they may later swoop in and claim victory. In so doing, Republicans reveal their core character flaw yet again. They don’t have the guts to fight.

Every time I hear some commentator allege that Hillary has a “serious” illness or won’t be up to the rigors of the Oval Office, I hear another dog whistle. It is the sound of surrender. And Democrats hear it. They hear Republican weakness. Republican timidity.

If this is the mark of Republican character, it should be no surprise that progressives have rolled over traditional values, free market values, and basic Constitutional rights. We’ve only had empty words, but no real resistance.

Republicans have become the Party of the Weak.

Eric Dixon

Eric Dixon is a conservative lawyer, campaign strategist and blockchain technology innovator. He has been an election lawyer and delegate candidate for the presidential campaigns of Ted Cruz and Steve Forbes, and has successfully represented media organizations including National Review in lawsuits against the government. A Yale Law School graduate, Mr. Dixon is headquartered out of New York and represents companies, entrepreneurs and investors on financing, corporate governance and regulatory compliance issues. Mr. Dixon is also a former radio talk show host, think tank research director and has completed thirteen marathons.