The lesser of two evils is still evil

Donald Trump Lesser of Two Evils

After the primaries, once the masses watched their carefully selected candidate lose to someone who does not share their same moral convictions and public policy concerns (or in my case the exact opposite of those beliefs), I once again started hearing the ‘lesser of two evils’ phrase in every political discussion among my family, friends, and even well-respected commentators and writers.

When did this philosophy become acceptable? At what point do we draw the line between lesser evil and unacceptable evil? Surely, it can’t be as simple at political party lines.

I have watched with great surprise as good friends and colleagues quietly sacrifice deep convictions, of which they were once boldly outspoken for, to support a candidate who directly opposes those beliefs simply because of a political party nomination. As a person with deeply rooted social conservative views and Christian beliefs I cannot accept this. Furthermore, I not only find such a stance to betray the conservative agenda, I also believe it is a betrayal against oneself.

For all the grief Ted Cruz received for his speech at the Republican National Convention, he was the only one to stand firm on the principles that the Republican Party claims to uphold. We finally have a politician who winds up being exactly who he says, and he is booed off the stage by the very delegates that have been trusted to support the ideals that he is standing for. This madness and hypocrisy is staggering.

You might be tempted to say and have no doubt heard the argument that there is no perfect person, and therefore no perfect candidate. While that statement is completely true and accurate, it is by no means a sufficient argument. You don’t have to be perfect to have honorable opinions on public policy. This is the crux of the dilemma. It is ultimately the candidate’s policy that I take issue with, not the soul or lifestyle of the individual.

While your vote won’t be a 1-to-1 vote for the candidate of your choice in our electorate system, it is still your opportunity to voice who you are and what you stand for. A vote for a political party that is shifting views from your own supports that very shift.

Your vote is your voice. What will your voice say about who you are?

Paul Caputo

Paul Caputo is a rare thing in modern America, a Millennial with deeply rooted social conservative views and opinions. Paul is an educated and experienced financial professional with a background in corporate accounting & finance. As an active member of his community, Paul is an adoptive & foster parent as well as a leader and mentor for teenage youth. Paul is driven by a core set of Judeo-Christian beliefs that not only direct his political ideals, but also who he is as an individual. Consequently, Paul is very outspoken against the current conservative establishment that has made a dramatic shift towards the left.